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August 24, 2018


The 2018-19 season of the "Waynesboro Science Talks" is set to kick-off on Tuesday, September, 11 at 7 p.m., when Dr. Eaton, professor of geology and environmental science at James Madison University, presents "The unique geology of the Waynesboro/Augusta County region and why it is important to us".  The presentation will take place at the Historic Wayne Theatre in Waynesboro, Virginia as part of the theatre's "Signature Speaker Series".  Admission is offered on a pay-what-you-will basis.

Dr. Eaton earned his Doctorate Degree from the Department of Environmental Sciences at the University of Virginia, and received his Masters Degree in Geology from Southern Illinois University, and a Bachelors degree in Geology from James Madison University.

Dr. Eaton began his teaching career as an Instructor of Geology in 1991 and has taught courses in hydrogeology, environmental soil science, earth surface processes, physical geology, engineering geology, natural hazards, and field techniques. His research interests include examining the frequency of landslides and catastrophic storms in the central Appalachians, sediment transport in river systems, and the role of geology in controlling the availability of groundwater resources.  Dr. Eaton also works as a geological consultant, primarily involved with locating high yielding water wells using fracture trace analysis in conjunction with other geologic methods of investigation.

The complete schedule of "Waynesboro Science Talks" can be found below.  To learn more about how to attend the presentation, please visit The Historic Wayne Theatre's website.



2018-19 Waynesboro Science Talks


September 11, 2018

The unique geology of the Waynesboro/Augusta County region and why it is important to us.

Dr. Eaton earned his Doctorate Degree from the Department of Environmental Sciences at the University of Virginia, and received his Masters Degree in Geology from Southern Illinois University, and a Bachelors degree in Geology from James Madison University.

Dr. Eaton began his teaching career as an Instructor of Geology in 1991 and has taught courses in hydrogeology, environmental soil science, earth surface processes, physical geology, engineering geology, natural hazards, and field techniques. His research interests include examining the frequency of landslides and catastrophic storms in the central Appalachians, sediment transport in river systems, and the role of geology in controlling the availability of groundwater resources.  Dr. Eaton also works as a geological consultant, primarily involved with locating high yielding water wells using fracture trace analysis in conjunction with other geologic methods of investigation.



November 13, 2018
Historic ecology of the Waynesboro/Augusta County region from the ancient times up to Jefferson’s surveys, with a discussion of the area’s first peoples.

Dr. Carole Nash, Ph D, is a JMU Professor of Anthropology and director of the Shenandoah National Park Environmental Archaeology Program.  Dr. Nash has 30 years of experience in cultural resource management with the National Park Service, National Forest Service, Commonwealth of Virginia, and with various private firms.



January 15, 2019
Early explorers of the region and their findings, including Lewis & Clark, David Starr Jordan, and others who advanced our record of natural history in the South River watershed and beyond, bridging the period from Jefferson’s survey to early 20 th century.

Dr. Thomas Benzing, Ph D, is a JMU Professor of ISAT, GS.  Dr. Benzing is a sitting member of the board of directors of the Center for Coldwaters Restoration, board member of the Virginia Museum of Natural History, and an active partner of the South River Science team.  Dr. Benzing is also a fly fisherman, who has spent many hours on the local waterways both in research activities and recreational activities.



February 12, 2019
Mussels in the South River and factors that influence them – Army Corps management, river morphology, flood control, evolution of our mindset in terms of aquatic management.

Dr. Jess Jones, Ph D, is a restoration biologist in the Virginia Tech College of Natural Resources and Environment and co-director of Virginia Tech’s Freshwater Mollusk Conservation Center.  Jones, who is employed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, but stationed in Virginia Tech’s Department of Fish and Wildlife Conservation, researches the restoration of endangered freshwater mussel populations, conservation management of rivers, and mussel propagation, population dynamics, and genetics.



March 12, 2019
NRDA specifics and explanation of the intended impact of the south river restoration.

The South River Science Team was established in 2001 and began conducting studies to understand how mercury enters the South River and why mercury in the South River and the South Fork Shenandoah River continues to remain elevated some 60 years after it was used at the former DuPont facility in Waynesboro, Virginia.



April 16, 2019
The South River and what do we do going forward with this vital economic driver?

Len Poulin is the Chair of the Center for Coldwaters Restoration, a member of the Virginia Museum of Natural History Foundation Board, an entrepreneur and businessman, has been active in efforts to redevelop Waynesboro’s downtown

Greg Hitchin, CE cD, is Director of Economic Development and Tourism for the City of Waynesboro.  Mr. Hitchin is also a member of the Center for Coldwaters Restoration Board of Directors, and a member of the International Economic Development Council, a non-profit membership organization that serves economic developers. With more than 5,000 members, IEDC is the largest organization of its kind.

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