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dinosaurs

Dinosaurs: Reign of the Giants

The museum's newest special exhibit is a Mesozoic masterpiece!  Dinosaurs: Reign of the Giants features a wide variety of life-size dinosaur cast skeletons and dinosaur fossils, including the only known fossil evidence thatTyrannosaurus rex and Triceratops engaged in a battle.  For the first time ever on public display, the exhibit features a Triceratopshorn showing clear evidence of healed bite marks from a T. rex, signaling that the bite occurred while the Triceratops was alive.

Other exhibit highlights include the Smithsonian’s iconic Stegosaurus stenops skeleton that was first displayed at the National Museum of Natural History in 1917 and re-cast in 2003, as well as a full skeleton cast of Triceratops horridus on loan from the Shenandoah Valley Discovery Museum.  Scroll down for a list of life-sized dinosaur casts and skulls are listed below available inside Dinosaurs: Reign of the Giants!

Stegosaurus
A large, plant-eating dinosaur distinguishable by two rows of bony plates on its back that lived during the Late Jurassic period, from approximately 155 to 150 million years ago

Triceratops
A large, plant-eating dinosaur distinguishable by its large frill and three horns that lived during the Late Cretaceous period, from approximately 68 to 66 million years ago

Deinonychus
A speedy and vicious carnivore of the Early Cretaceous period, with large, retractable, hunting claws on its feet that it used to subdue and kill its prey, from approximately 115 to 108 million years ago.

Tyrannosaurus rex (skull)
A large, carnivorous, theropod dinosaur that roamed in what is now western North America during the Late Cretaceous period, from approximately 68 to 66 million years ago.

Appalachiosaurus (skull) **currently removed from exhibit
A large, carnivorous predator that roamed what is now eastern North America during the Late Cretaceous period, from approximately 77 million years ago.

Diplodocus (skull)
A massive, long-necked herbivore of what is now western North America during the Late Jurassic period, from approximately 154 to 152 million years ago.

Additionally, the exhibit features a dino dig-pit, allowing children to pretend to be a real-life paleontologist, as they dig for dinosaur "fossils".

The exhibit and its displays reside in the Special Exhibit Hall adjacent to the museum's Harvest Foundation Hall of Ancient Life, which features other life-size, cast skeletons, including the 40-foot-long, meat-eating Acrocanthosaurus.


Special thanks to our exhibit sponsors!
          Bassett

The Helen S. & Charles G.
Patterson, Jr. Charitable
Foundation Trust

Blue Ridge Bank

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